Controversies in Ethnic  Studies

Ethnic Studies 200C                                                                                     Ross Frank
Spring 2005                                                                                                  Office:   SSB 227
Wed. 11AM – 1:50PM, SSB 253                                                                 Phone:   534-6646
                                                                                                                      rfrank@weber.ucsd.edu

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Course Description

Many issues that have sparked public and academic debate involve the comparative study of race and ethnicity in fundamental ways.  The purpose of the course is to bring knowledge of how race, class, ethnicity, and gender are constructed, the history of Ethnic Studies, and an understanding of comparative methodologies, to bear on “controversies”, surrounding the study of race and ethnicity, and that have significant repercussions for academic research questions and local community concerns. 

We will examine the academic construction of these controversies in view of their public and political context, and we will look at the ways in which these junctures generate discourses about themes crucial to research questions that center on race and ethnicity.  The aim of the course is to understand how the larger context of discourse and praxis inside and outside the academy shapes the creation of arguments and their reception.  We specifically intend to develop modes of analysis and criticism that can be applied to understanding the complexities of “controversies.”

Although the readings each week cover a range of topics, some general questions pertain to each session:

•          How do the represented voices construct and frame a "controversy" out of issues germane to the study of race and ethnicity?

•          What are the issues that the participants claim to be addressing in their discourse about the topic?

•          Where do the various participants fall within disciplinary areas, methodological strategies, and political arenas?

•          How do you analyze the fundamental or critical issues really at stake in a given "controversy" as they pertain to Ethnic Studies?



Evaluation

Seminar assignments will consists of:

1)      group discussions of the weekly readings in the seminar meeting.

2)      present extra reading(s) during class session (Weeks 2-5, 7-8); 

3)      a paper (5+ pages) analyzing and critiquing Peter Brimelow, Alien Nation due in the seminar meeting discussing the book (Week 3 assignment);

4)      lead or co-lead one seminar discussion over the quarter (Week 4-10);

5)      one paper in which you synthesize the material from the week chosen above (5) in the light of the general questions (above) and the relevant issues raised during discussion in seminar (5+ pages).  This paper will be due in the class session after the presentation;

6)      a group project or individual paper analyzing some aspect or aspects of UC or UCSD diversity using relevant statistics, due Wednesday of Finals week;

7)      lead discussion about previous week’s Colloquium presenter. (click of the link to see schedule).

Weekly assignments will be chosen by seminar participants during class in Week 1 or 2  to allow for as much flexibility as possible during the quarter.

Individual work will be evaluated as follows:

A.    Discussion and seminar presentations form 50% of the grade (100 points).

            1) = 5 points per session;  2) = 20 points ;  4) = 20 points;  7) = 10 points.

            I will be available to give mid-term evaluations in office hours after the Week 5 meeting.

            You may make appointments to discuss seminar participation at any time.

B.    The three written papers (3, 5 & 6) form 50% of the grade, weighted equally

If this seems complicated you may forget about it entirely, so long you do the work.



Syllabus

Readings on order at Groundworks (books read in their entirety are marked “*”):

Brimelow, Peter.  Alien Nation. New York: Random House [Harper Perennial], 1995.*

Crosby, Faye J. and Cheryl VanDeVeer (eds.).  Sex, Race, and Merit: Debating Affirmative Action in Education and Employment. U. of Michigan, 2000.

Gould, Stephen Jay.  The Mismeasure of Man.  New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1996.*Ī

Perry, Theresa and Lisa Delpit (eds.).  The Real Ebonics Debate: Power, Language, and the Education of the African-American Children, Boston: Beacon, 1998.

Portes, Alejandro,.  Immigrant America : a portrait,  Berkeley : UC Press, 1996, 2nd ed.

Readings are marked in the syllabus according to the following:

G            available at Groundwork Bookstore.
D            will be distributed in seminar.
W            available on course website:  http://weber.ucsd.edu/~rfrank
[xx]          will be assigned individually in seminar.
R            on reserve online at:  http:/reserves.ucsd.edu


Week 1:  Intro., Journal Exercise, & Media Critique

Please read the following for Week 1 seminar:

Marks, Jonathan.  Human Diversity:  Genes, Race, and History.  New York:  Aldine De Gruyter, 1994.  (1-24, 25-47, 157-182).  R

Thomas, David Hurst.  Skull Wars:  Kennewick Mam Archaeology, and the Battle for Native American Identity.  New York:  Basic Books, 2000.  (102-120)R


Week 2:   Science, Racialism, & Statistics

Herrnstein, Richard J., and Charles Murray.  The Bell Curve:  the reshaping of American life by difference in intelligence.  New York: Free Press, 1994, xix-115, 267-591  [117-266]   D  (I have a number of copies, but please try to get a hold of one!)

Gould, Stephen Jay.  The Mismeasure of Man.  New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1996, 15-50 

Degler, Carl N.  In Search of Human Nature.  Oxford: University of Oxford Press, 1991.  [3-104]   D

      Pres ________________Jewels______________________         ______Degler________

      Pres ________________Rebecca____________________          ______H & M________


Week 3:   Science & Racialism II / Attack on Immigration

Gould, Stephen Jay.  The Mismeasure of Man.  New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1996, 176-424  [51-175]  G

Jonathan Marks. What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee Apes, People, and Their Genes. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002, [51-71]  R

Brimelow, Peter.  Alien Nation.  New York: Random House [HarperPerennial], 1995.  G

      Pres _____________Bing_________________________             _______Gould________

      Pres _____________Angela_______________________             _______Marks_______


Week 4:  Attack on Immigration  II

Clark, William A. V. Clark, The California Cauldron.  New York:  Guillford Press, 1998, [Chapters 1, 7, and 8]  D

Portes, Alejandro, Immigrant America : a portrait,  Berkeley : UC Press, 1996, 2nd ed., chapters 1 & 8  G

Bill Ong Hing. Defining America through Immigration Policy. Mapping Racisms. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2004, Chapter 10 & Epilogue, 184-205, 259-275  R

      Pres ____________________Marissa_______________             _______Clark________

      Pres ____________________Marta_______________________________________

      Pres ____________________Anna_______________________________________

 


Week 5:  Language & Culture:  Black English

Smitherman, Geneva.  "Introduction."  Black English and the Education of Black Children and Youth, in ed. Geneva Smitherman.  Detroit: Center for Black Studies, Wayne State University, 1981.  11-31D

Lewis, Kenneth.  "Overview."  Black English and the Education of Black Children and Youth, in ed. Geneva Smitherman.  Detroit: Center for Black Studies, Wayne State University, 1981.  42-45D

Baldwin, James.  "If Black English Isn't a Language, Then Tell Me What It Is?"  Black English and the Education of Black Children and Youth, in ed. Geneva Smitherman.  Detroit: Center for Black Studies, Wayne State University, 1981.  390-392.  Reprinted from NYT, 7/29/79.  D

Baldwin, James.  "Black English:  A Dishonest Argument."  Black English and the Education of Black Children and Youth, in ed. Geneva Smitherman.  Detroit: Center for Black Studies, Wayne State University, 1981.  54-60D

Dillard, J. L.  "A Sketch of the History of Black English," in Black American English:  its background and its usage in the schools and in literature.  Paul Stoller.  New York: Delta/Dell Publishing Co., 1975.  17-48D

Feigenbaum, Irwin.  "The Use of Nonstandard English in Teaching Standard:  Contrast and Comparison," in Black American English:  its background and its usage in the schools and in literature.  New York: Delta/Dell Publishing Co., 1975.  143-157D

Abrahams, Roger D., and Geneva Gay.  "Talking Black in the Classroom," in Black American English:  its background and its usage in the schools and in literature.  New York: Delta/Dell Publishing Co., 1975.  158-167D

Bernstein, Basil.  "Social Class, Language and Socialization," in Language and Social Context:  Selected Readings.  ed. Pier Paolo Gigliolo.  New York: Penguin.  157-178D

Labov, William.  Language in the Inner City:  Studies in Black English Vernacular.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1972.  Chapter 8: 297-353D

"The Oakland Ebonics Resolution," "Ebonics Resolution Revisions," The Oakland Policy Statement," in The Real Ebonics Debate:  power, language, and the education of African-American children, ed. Theresa Perry and Lisa Delpit.  Boston:  Beacon, 1998.  143-149  D & G

Perry, Theresa, "I’on Know Why They Be Trippin’":  Reflections on the Ebonics Debate, in The Real Ebonics Debate:  power, language, and the education of African-American children, ed. Theresa Perry and Lisa Delpit.  Boston:  Beacon, 1998.  3-15  D & G

O'Neil, Wayne, "If Ebonics Isn't a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is? (pace James Baldwin, 1979)"  in The Real Ebonics Debate:  power, language, and the education of African-American children, ed. Theresa Perry and Lisa Delpit.  Boston:  Beacon, 1998.  38-47D & G

McWhorter, John H.  Title Losing the race : self-sabotage in Black America, New York : Free Press, 2000.  Chapter 6, 184-211D

Fasold, Ralph W.  “Ebonic Need Not Be English,” in Center for Applied Linguistics, Dec. 1999. W

Sutcliffe, David.  British Black English.  Oxford: Basil Blackwell Publisher Ltd., 1982.  [Chapters 2-3:36-91]  D

The National Head Start Association, NYT advertisement, 10/9/98. W

 

      Pres _______________Marta_______________________            ______Sutcliffe_______

      Pres _______________Jewels___________________________________________

      Pres ______________________________________________________________

 



Week 6:  Cultural Representation and the Ownership of Culture I

Truettner, William H.  “Introduction:  Ideology and Image:  Repainting the Past,” in The West as America.  ed. William H. Truettner.  Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.  27-54D

Truettner, William H.  “Prelude to Expansion:  Justifying Westward Expansion,”  in The West as America.  ed. William H. Truettner.  Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.  55-96D

Nemerov, Alex.  “‘Doing the ‘Old America’”:  The Image of the American West, 1880-1992,” in The West as America.  ed. William H. Truettner.  Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.  285-344D

News reports and reviews of West as America. D (xerox)

Tyler, Ron.  “Western Art and the Historian:  The West as America, A Review Essay.”  Journal of Arizona History 1992; 207-224D

Stein, Roger B.  “Visualizing Conflict in The West as America.”  The Public Historian 1992; 14:3,  85-91.  D

Treuttner, William H., and Alexander Nemerov.  “What You See is Not Necessarily What You Get.”  Montana 1992; 42:3,  70-76D

Guilliford, Andrew.  “Visitors Respond:  Selections from ‘The West as America’ Comment Books.”  Montana 1992; 42:3,  77-80D

Treuttner, William H., “For Museum Audiences, The Morning to a New Day?” in Exhibiting Dilemmas.  ed. Amy Henderson and Adriennen L. Kaeppler.  Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997.  28-46D

Images from West of America  at http://www.artstor.org/info/   (200cimages/ethnicst)  W

      Pres ____________________Marissa_____________________________________

      Pres _______________________________________________________________

 



Week 7:  Cultural Representation and the Ownership of Culture II

Arieff, Allison.  “A Different Sort of (P)Reservation:  Some Thoughts of the National Museum of the American Indian.”  Museum Anthropology 1995; 19:2,  78-90D

Johanna Neuman and Emma Schwartz, "This Time, It's Native Americans wWho Stake Claim To Prine Land", LA Times, 9/22/2004. D

Clifford, James.  “Four Northwest Coast Museums:  Travel Relections,” in Exhibiting Cultures:  The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display.  ed. Ivan Karp, and Steven D. Levine.  Washington, DC: Smithsonial Institution Press, 1991.  212-254D

Phillips, Ruth B.  “Why Not Tourist Art?  Significant Silences in Native American Museum Representations,” in  After Colonialism:  Imperian Histories and Postcolonial Displacements.  ed. Gyan Prakash.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995.  99-125D

Greene, Candace S., and Thomas D. Drescher.  “The Tipi With Battle Pictures:  The Kiowa Tradition of Intangible Property Rights.”  The Trademark Report 1994; 84:42,  418-433D

Farr, William E.  “Troubled Bundles, Troubled Blackfeet.”  Montana 14 1993; 43:4,  2-17D

Scriver, Bob.  The Blackfeet, Artists of the Northern Plains: The Scriver Collection of Blackfeet Indian Artifacts and Related Objects, 1894-1990.  Kansas City: The Lowell Press, Inc., 1990.    [library copy only]

Junkerman, Charles.  “Kiowa Sun Shield.”  Metropolis, Oct. 1994  D

Washburn, Betty (Sankadota), Petitioner.  Petition to the Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley from the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma…. , 14 Feb. 1994.  D (xerox)

NAGPRA Review Committee, Selected Minutes, 1995-2000  D

      Pres _______________Miget_____________________             _______Scriver_______

      Pres _______________Rebecca________________________________________

      Pres ______________________________________________________________



Week 8:  Imperialism & Post-Colonialism:  Speaking in Others’ Tongues

Todorov, Tzvetan.  The Conquest of America.  New York: Harper & Row, 1984.  Chapter 2:  51-123D

Frank, Ross.  “The Codex Cortés:  Inscribing the Conquest of Mexico.”  Dispositio  1989 [1991]; 14:36-38 187-211D

Guha, Ranjit.  “On Some Aspects of the Historiography of Colonial India.”  Selected Subatern Studies.  ed. Ranajit Guha, and Gayatri Chakravtoy Spivak.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.  37-44D

Spivak, Gayatri Chakravoty.  “Subaltern Studies:  Decontructing Historiography.”  Selected Subatern Studies.  ed. Ranajit Guha, and Gayatri Chakravtoy Spivak.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.  3-32D

Chakrabarty, Dipesh.  “The Death of History?  Historical Consciousness and the Culture of Late Capitalism.”  Public Culture 1992.  4:2, 47-65D

Sahlins, Marshall.  Islands of History.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985. vii-xix;  Chapter 1:1-31;  Chapter 4: 104-135D

Obeyesekere, Gannath.  The Apotheosis of Captain Cook:  European Mythmaking in the Pacific.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992.  xiii-xvii3-2240-130201-225 (notes).  D

Sahlins, Marshall.  How “Natives” Think.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995. Introduction: 1-15;  Chapter 3:  117-147D

Borofsky, Robert, “Cook, Lono, Obeyesekere, and Sahlins.”  In Robert Borofsky ,  Remembering of Pacific Pasts, Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2000.  420-442D

Tobin, Jeffrey, “Cultural Construction and Native Antionalism:  Report from the Hawaiian Front,”  Boundary 2, 1994, 21:1, 111-133  D

Briggs, Charles. “The Politics of Discursive Authority in Research on the ‘Invention of Tradition’.” Cultural Anthropology 1996; 11:4,  435-479D

Bergendorff, Steen, Ulla Hasager, and Prter Henriques.  “Mythopraxis and History:  On the interpretation of the Makahiki.”  Journal of the Polynesian Society 1988; 97:4, [391-408]  D

Friedman, Jonathan.  “No History is an Island.”  Critique of Anthropology 1988; 8:3, [7-39D

Sahlins, Marshall.  “Deserted Islands of History:  Reply to Jonathan Freidman.”  Critique of Anthropology 1988; 8:3, [41-51D

Mukherjee, Rudrangshu.  “‘Satan Let Loose Upon the Earth’:   The Kanpur Massacre in India in the Revolt of 1857.”  Past and Present 1990; 128:[92-116D

English, Barbara, and Rudrangshu Mukherjee.  “Debate:  The Kanpur Massacres in India in the Revolt of 1857.”  Past and Present 1994; 142:[169-189D

      Pres _______________Madel?______________________              ___Bergendorff, et al___

      Pres ______________or Madel?_____________________              __Freidman & Sahlins__

      Pres________________Anna______________________              __Mukherjee & English_

      Pres _______________Miget___________________________________________

      Pres _______________Bing____________________________________________

 



Week 9:  What Happened to Affirmative Action?

Ball, Howard.  The Bakke case : Race, Education, and Affirmative Action. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000, Preface & Intro. & Chapter 8; xi-21 & 173-206.  D

U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Toward an understanding of BakkeD

Introduction, 1-4.
Regents vs. Bakke, 5-12.
Marshall’s Opinion, 127-142.
EEOC Affirmative Action Guidelines, 163-173.

Eastland, Terry, and William J. Bennett.  Counting by Race: Equality from the Founding Fathers to Bakke and Weber.  New York: Basic Books, 1979, Epilogue, 197-210D

Readings in Crosby, Faye J. and Cheryl VanDeVeer (eds.).  Sex, Race, and Merit: Debating Affirmative Action in Education and Employment. U. of Michigan, 2000:  G

Regents of the UC v. Bakke, 236-51.
Prop 209, 230.
Articles, 13-21, 29-30, 60-63, 67-70.
Williams, Patricia J., 75-80
Thernstrom and Thernstrom, 186-201
Bowen and Bok, 114-123.
Orlans, Harold., 167-173
Steele, Claude., 124-133.
Steele, Shelby., 144-149.

Milem, Jeffrey F.  “The Educational Benefits of Diversity: Evidence from Multiple Sectors,” in Mitchell J. Chang, et al (eds.), Compelling Interest : Examining the Evidence on Racial Dynamics in Colleges and Universities. Stanford, 2003, 126-169  R

UCSD Academic Senate Task Force on Underrepresented Faculty Report, October, 2004.  D

Unprecedented Urgency: Gender Discrimination in Faculty History at the University of California, May 2005. D

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AFFIRMATIVE ACTION GUIDELINES FOR RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF FACULTY. D

Joel Best. Damned Lies and Statistics : Untangling Numbers from the Media, Politicians, and Activists. Berkeley: UC Press, 2001, chapter 4, 96-127.  R

UC/UCSD statistics: 
http://www.ucop.edu/acadadv/datamgmt/welcome.html
http://www.ucop.edu/acadadv/datamgmt/graddata/
http://ugr8.ucsd.edu/sriweb/sri.htm

      Pres ________________Angela_________________________________________

      Pres _______________________________________________________________



Week 10:  The Academy, Academic Freedom , Ward Churchill, and Chicken Roosts

Locke, John.  Selection from:   Second Treatise of Government.  Preface – Chapter V, Chapter IX-X.  R

Herder, Johann Gottfried.  Selection from:   Essay on the Origin of Languages.  John H. Moran and Alexander Gode, trans. & ed., 114-129  R

Arendt, Hannah.  "What is Freedom?” in  Between past and future; eight exercises in political thought. New York: Viking Press, 1968.  R

Academic freedom materials:

UC Academic Personnel Manual — APM 010 — Academic Freedom

President Aktinson's Paper on Academic Freedom


Defend Dissent and Critical Thinking on Campus

UCSD Ethnic Studies Scholars Make a Statement on Academic Freedom

Students for Academic Freedom Handbook

Various readings about the Ward Churchill controversy  D & W
Check course web site for latest materials.

CNN programs:  1) Ward Churchill;   2) David Horowitz  D (CD distributed in class).

      Pres _________________Madel_________________________________________

      Pres _______________________________________________________________

 


Ross Frank, © 2005, all rights reserved